race & faith


April 4, 2018 marked the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Our civic appreciation of his contributions often omits a vital dimension of the civil rights story. Dr. King and the other early leaders were shaped and motivated by the liberating good news of Jesus Christ.

In a special curated series, Second-Ponce gave attention to the essential role of faith in this movement. Use Me God: A Church Looks at the Intersection of Race + Faith was a four-session dive into this topic, and we hope you find meaning in this resource.


Series Speakers & Session Recordings

Tap or hover over the photos below to read about our fantastic series speakers. Each of these presenters shared personal stories and historical context for the topic of race and faith.

Since 1980 David Hull has served as pastor of five very different kinds of churches. Beginning with a rural church in Kentucky, his ministry then moved to a new church plant in the suburbs of Charlotte, NC which was followed by a small town “county seat First Baptist” in Laurens, South Carolina. From the small town he moved to a downtown First Baptist located next to a university in Knoxville, TN and then for twelve years was the pastor of First Baptist Church in the “Rocket City” of Huntsville, Alabama. Each ministry opportunity has broadened his understanding of the church and deepened his love for congregations of all kinds.  In 2014 David transitioned from pastoral ministry when his wife, Jane, was called to be the pastor of Union Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Watkinsville, GA. He now serves as the Associate Pastor of Second-Ponce de Leon Baptist Church in Atlanta, GA. In addition, he is the Southeast Coordinator for The Center for Healthy Churches ( www.CHchurches.org ), a group of coaches and consultants whose mission is “devoted to improving the spiritual, emotional and organizational health of churches and ministers.” David is on the Adjunct Faculty at McAfee School of Theology of Mercer University where he has taught leadership and pastoral preaching courses. Since leaving Huntsville he has served one year as the Interim Pastor of the First Baptist Church in St. Petersburg, Florida, and one year as the Interim Pastor of the First Baptist Church in Augusta, GA. David and Jane have two married children, Emily and Andrew and three grandchildren.

Since 1980 David Hull has served as pastor of five very different kinds of churches. Beginning with a rural church in Kentucky, his ministry then moved to a new church plant in the suburbs of Charlotte, NC which was followed by a small town “county seat First Baptist” in Laurens, South Carolina. From the small town he moved to a downtown First Baptist located next to a university in Knoxville, TN and then for twelve years was the pastor of First Baptist Church in the “Rocket City” of Huntsville, Alabama. Each ministry opportunity has broadened his understanding of the church and deepened his love for congregations of all kinds.

In 2014 David transitioned from pastoral ministry when his wife, Jane, was called to be the pastor of Union Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Watkinsville, GA. He now serves as the Associate Pastor of Second-Ponce de Leon Baptist Church in Atlanta, GA. In addition, he is the Southeast Coordinator for The Center for Healthy Churches (www.CHchurches.org), a group of coaches and consultants whose mission is “devoted to improving the spiritual, emotional and organizational health of churches and ministers.” David is on the Adjunct Faculty at McAfee School of Theology of Mercer University where he has taught leadership and pastoral preaching courses. Since leaving Huntsville he has served one year as the Interim Pastor of the First Baptist Church in St. Petersburg, Florida, and one year as the Interim Pastor of the First Baptist Church in Augusta, GA. David and Jane have two married children, Emily and Andrew and three grandchildren.

Dr. David Hull

Taylor Branch is an American author and public speaker best known for his landmark narrative history of the civil rights era,  America in the King Years.  The trilogy’s first book,  Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63,  won the Pulitzer Prize and numerous other awards in 1989. Two successive volumes also gained critical and popular success:  Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years, 1963-65 (1998) , and  At Canaan’s Edge: America in the King Years, 1965-1968 (2006) .  Branch continues to write about civil rights history in his latest book,  The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement  (2013). It presents eighteen key episodes across the full span of the era, selected and knitted together in language from the trilogy, with new introductions for each of the chapters. The result is a compact, 190-page immersion for readers in this transformative period of American history.  He served as executive producer for the HBO documentary film “King in the Wilderness” (2018), about Dr. King’s final three years before his assassination in Memphis. The film is directed by Emmy Award winner Peter Kunhardt of Kunhardt films. It features a treasure of archival footage from the years 1965-68, with interviews from key eyewitnesses including Joan Baez, Harry Belafonte, Xernona Clayton, Marian Wright Edelman, Jesse Jackson, Clarence Jones, Bernard Lafayette, Diane Nash, C.T. Vivian and Andrew Young.  Branch began his career in 1970 as a staff journalist for  The Washington Monthly ,  Harper’s , and  Esquire . He taught history courses at Goucher College and at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He holds honorary doctoral degrees from fourteen colleges and universities. Other citations include the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008 and the National Humanities Medal in 1999.  Samples of book reviews, lectures, media appearances, blogs, printed commentary, and musical tracks are available on his career website,  www.taylorbranch.com .

Taylor Branch is an American author and public speaker best known for his landmark narrative history of the civil rights era, America in the King Years. The trilogy’s first book, Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63, won the Pulitzer Prize and numerous other awards in 1989. Two successive volumes also gained critical and popular success: Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years, 1963-65 (1998), and At Canaan’s Edge: America in the King Years, 1965-1968 (2006).

Branch continues to write about civil rights history in his latest book, The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement (2013). It presents eighteen key episodes across the full span of the era, selected and knitted together in language from the trilogy, with new introductions for each of the chapters. The result is a compact, 190-page immersion for readers in this transformative period of American history.

He served as executive producer for the HBO documentary film “King in the Wilderness” (2018), about Dr. King’s final three years before his assassination in Memphis. The film is directed by Emmy Award winner Peter Kunhardt of Kunhardt films. It features a treasure of archival footage from the years 1965-68, with interviews from key eyewitnesses including Joan Baez, Harry Belafonte, Xernona Clayton, Marian Wright Edelman, Jesse Jackson, Clarence Jones, Bernard Lafayette, Diane Nash, C.T. Vivian and Andrew Young.

Branch began his career in 1970 as a staff journalist for The Washington Monthly, Harper’s, and Esquire. He taught history courses at Goucher College and at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He holds honorary doctoral degrees from fourteen colleges and universities. Other citations include the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008 and the National Humanities Medal in 1999.

Samples of book reviews, lectures, media appearances, blogs, printed commentary, and musical tracks are available on his career website, www.taylorbranch.com.

Taylor Branch

Ambassador Andrew Young has earned worldwide recognition as a pioneer in and champion of civil and human rights. Ambassador Young’s lifelong dedication to service is illustrated by his extensive leadership experience of over sixty-five years, serving as a member of Congress, African American U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Mayor of Atlanta and ordained minister, among other positions.  During the 1960’s, Young was a key strategist and negotiator during civil rights campaigns that led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Appointed as an Ambassador to the United Nations in 1977, Young negotiated an end to white-minority rule in Namibia and Zimbabwe and brought President Carter’s emphasis on human rights to international diplomacy efforts. As two-term Mayor of Atlanta, Young brought in over 1,100 businesses, over 70 billion in foreign direct investments and generated over a million jobs.  Ambassador Young has received honorary degrees from more than 100 universities and colleges in the U.S. and abroad and has received various awards, including an Emmy Lifetime Achievement award in 2011 and the Dan Sweat Award in 2017. His portrait also became part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery.  Ambassador Young also serves on a number of boards, including, but not limited to, the Martin Luther King Center for Non-Violent Social Change, Morehouse College, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State and America’s Mart. In 2003, he and his wife, Carolyn McClain Young, founded the Andrew J. Young Foundation to support and promote education, health, leadership and human rights in the U.S., Africa, and the Caribbean. Young currently serves as the Chairman of the Andrew J. Young Foundation.  In 2012, Young retired from GoodWorks International, LLC, after well over a decade of facilitating sustainable economic development in the business sectors of the Caribbean and Africa. Young was born in 1932 in New Orleans, and he currently lives in Atlanta with his wife. He is also a father of three daughters and one son, and a grandfather of eight.

Ambassador Andrew Young has earned worldwide recognition as a pioneer in and champion of civil and human rights. Ambassador Young’s lifelong dedication to service is illustrated by his extensive leadership experience of over sixty-five years, serving as a member of Congress, African American U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Mayor of Atlanta and ordained minister, among other positions.

During the 1960’s, Young was a key strategist and negotiator during civil rights campaigns that led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Appointed as an Ambassador to the United Nations in 1977, Young negotiated an end to white-minority rule in Namibia and Zimbabwe and brought President Carter’s emphasis on human rights to international diplomacy efforts. As two-term Mayor of Atlanta, Young brought in over 1,100 businesses, over 70 billion in foreign direct investments and generated over a million jobs.

Ambassador Young has received honorary degrees from more than 100 universities and colleges in the U.S. and abroad and has received various awards, including an Emmy Lifetime Achievement award in 2011 and the Dan Sweat Award in 2017. His portrait also became part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery.

Ambassador Young also serves on a number of boards, including, but not limited to, the Martin Luther King Center for Non-Violent Social Change, Morehouse College, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State and America’s Mart. In 2003, he and his wife, Carolyn McClain Young, founded the Andrew J. Young Foundation to support and promote education, health, leadership and human rights in the U.S., Africa, and the Caribbean. Young currently serves as the Chairman of the Andrew J. Young Foundation.

In 2012, Young retired from GoodWorks International, LLC, after well over a decade of facilitating sustainable economic development in the business sectors of the Caribbean and Africa. Young was born in 1932 in New Orleans, and he currently lives in Atlanta with his wife. He is also a father of three daughters and one son, and a grandfather of eight.

Amb. Andrew Young

Natosha Reid Rice currently serves as the Associate General Counsel for Real Estate and Finance at Habitat for Humanity International where she initiates and manages financing programs and strategies to generate sources of capital that enable Habitat affiliates to provide decent, affordable housing to families throughout the country. In addition to her work at Habitat, Natosha also serves as an Associate Pastor at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.  Prior to joining Habitat, Natosha practiced law in the commercial real estate practices of Alston & Bird, LLP, in Atlanta, Georgia and Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton and Garrison in New York City. While at these firms, she specialized in commercial real estate development transactions, acquisitions, dispositions and leasing.  Natosha is passionate about providing a voice to the voiceless and opportunities to communities that have been historically disadvantaged. She is a past Board Chair for Georgia Women for a Change and currently serves on the boards of the YWCA of Greater Atlanta, the Atlanta Community Foodbank and Invest Atlanta’s Atlanta Emerging Markets, Inc. She has been actively involved in efforts to pass legislation and policies to protect victims of human sex trafficking in Georgia and provide for a fair workplace for women. Her work alongside other activists and advocacy organizations, led to the passage of the Safe Harbor/Rachel’s Law in 2015 and a state Constitutional Amendment in 2017 that outlines the operation of the Safe Harbor for Sexually Exploited Children Fund and Commission.  In addition, she is a frequent keynote speaker and facilitator for community/civic organizations, churches, colleges and corporate groups on topics such as the intersection of faith and justice, the impact of privilege, race and gender justice, leadership development and community empowerment. She is also the founder of Fresh Rain for Life Ministries, a non-denominational ministry that provides a  sanctuary for women in the midst of life  through worship services, retreats, bible studies, workshops and mission outreach.  Natosha has received recognition and several awards for her work and leadership including the YWCA Academy of Women Achievers, the Circle of Friends Pearl Award and the Church Women United (Atlanta Unit) Outstanding Young Woman. Natosha was also a member of the Leadership Atlanta Class of 2014. Natosha was recently chosen to participate in the 2017-2018 International Women’s Forum Leadership Foundation Fellows Program with 35 other women from 14 nations.  Natosha received her J.D. from Harvard Law School and her B.A. in Government with honors from Harvard/Radcliffe College where she was a Harvard/Radcliffe Class Marshall and awarded the Captain Jonathan Fay Prize (Radcliffe’s Highest Honor) and the E.P. Saltonstall Prize. Natosha lives in metro Atlanta with her husband Corey Rice and their children, Kayla, Malachi and Caleb.

Natosha Reid Rice currently serves as the Associate General Counsel for Real Estate and Finance at Habitat for Humanity International where she initiates and manages financing programs and strategies to generate sources of capital that enable Habitat affiliates to provide decent, affordable housing to families throughout the country. In addition to her work at Habitat, Natosha also serves as an Associate Pastor at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Prior to joining Habitat, Natosha practiced law in the commercial real estate practices of Alston & Bird, LLP, in Atlanta, Georgia and Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton and Garrison in New York City. While at these firms, she specialized in commercial real estate development transactions, acquisitions, dispositions and leasing.

Natosha is passionate about providing a voice to the voiceless and opportunities to communities that have been historically disadvantaged. She is a past Board Chair for Georgia Women for a Change and currently serves on the boards of the YWCA of Greater Atlanta, the Atlanta Community Foodbank and Invest Atlanta’s Atlanta Emerging Markets, Inc. She has been actively involved in efforts to pass legislation and policies to protect victims of human sex trafficking in Georgia and provide for a fair workplace for women. Her work alongside other activists and advocacy organizations, led to the passage of the Safe Harbor/Rachel’s Law in 2015 and a state Constitutional Amendment in 2017 that outlines the operation of the Safe Harbor for Sexually Exploited Children Fund and Commission.

In addition, she is a frequent keynote speaker and facilitator for community/civic organizations, churches, colleges and corporate groups on topics such as the intersection of faith and justice, the impact of privilege, race and gender justice, leadership development and community empowerment. She is also the founder of Fresh Rain for Life Ministries, a non-denominational ministry that provides a sanctuary for women in the midst of life through worship services, retreats, bible studies, workshops and mission outreach.

Natosha has received recognition and several awards for her work and leadership including the YWCA Academy of Women Achievers, the Circle of Friends Pearl Award and the Church Women United (Atlanta Unit) Outstanding Young Woman. Natosha was also a member of the Leadership Atlanta Class of 2014. Natosha was recently chosen to participate in the 2017-2018 International Women’s Forum Leadership Foundation Fellows Program with 35 other women from 14 nations.

Natosha received her J.D. from Harvard Law School and her B.A. in Government with honors from Harvard/Radcliffe College where she was a Harvard/Radcliffe Class Marshall and awarded the Captain Jonathan Fay Prize (Radcliffe’s Highest Honor) and the E.P. Saltonstall Prize. Natosha lives in metro Atlanta with her husband Corey Rice and their children, Kayla, Malachi and Caleb.

Natosha Reid Rice


Session Recordings

The presentations of each of our four speakers were recorded and we encourage you to watch them with family, friends or small groups. After, take some time to discuss your own experience with the intersection of race and faith.


Online & Print Resources

For Children

  • God’s Dream by Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Douglas Carlton Abrams and LeUyen Pham

    Archbishop Desmond Tutu has a vision of God’s dream that everyone will see they are brothers and sisters. People will reach out and hold each other’s hands. And when they are angry and hurt each other, they say they’re sorry and forgive.

  • Who Was Martin Luther King, Jr.? by Bonnie Bader

    With clearly written text that explains this tumultuous time in history, this book celebrates the vision and the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. .

  • Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Doreen Rapport

    This picture-book biography is an introduction for young readers to learn about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Doreen Rappaport weaves the words of Dr. King into a narrative about his life.

For Youth

  • Who is My Neighbor?

    This Bible study from New Baptist Covenant explores the parable of the Good Samaritan in the light of the work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the current context of racial justice in our nation.

  • Selma: Faith & Family Guide

    We are surrounded by distractions, worrying over things that will ultimately pass away and ultimately ignoring what really matters. Selmaand the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. encourage us to discern what is important in life and to keep it our main focus. And maybe, we can make a difference in the world.

For Adults

Books written by Ambassador Andrew Young (available on Amazon):

Books written by Taylor Branch (available on Amazon):